George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trustelephants

News

Letter to DHL employees re rhino (Eliska) translocation One of the things of which I am most proud is the support DHL has given to supporting animal conservation. [more]

Rhino translocation The upcoming rhino translocation of Eliska (booked for next week) is now fully arranged and DHL are doing an amazing job of organising their side of everything, including donating the flight, which is the most massive contribution. Dvur Kralove Zoo in Czech Republic and the Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA) are in constant communication, and the move is being filmed by Maverick. DHL are organising the social media and the hasktag #DHLRhino will be in evidence on Twitter. [link]

Royal rhino This article appeared in the Times recently. [link]

Outreach GAWPT has always wanted to help construct a VTC.  With the great backing and support of the Suzuki Rhino Club, we were able to raise funds from the Suzuki Rhino Club ambassadors, the Watoto Foundation, Wilde Ganzen and the Fentener van Vlissingens.  Noud van Hout of the Watoto Foundation has overseen all the construction of the VTC and this is nearing completion. [more]

About us

The George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trust was formed in England in 1979 to raise funds for the work being done in the Kora National Park in northern Kenya by George Adamson and his assistant Tony Fitzjohn.

Originally called the Kora Wildlife Preservation Trust,  George, in 1988,  asked that the name be changed to the George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trust so that projects could be undertaken that were not confined to Kora. Since then, substantial effort has gone in to the restoration of the Mkomazi Game Reserve in Tanzania as well as advice and aid being made available to Kora, when requested, in continuation of Adamson's dream of an Africa with wild and natural areas where animals can remain free.

So far, nearly two million dollars has been invested in this unique undertaking with funds provided by small groups of dedicated individuals as well as the generous backing of corporate sponsors and institutions. In addition, we continue to enjoy the full support of the Tanzanian Government, for whom the Mkomazi Game Reserve remains a National Priority Project. The Mkomazi project now directly employs over 40 Tanzanian personnel. We believe it to be one of the more important wildlife projects in Africa today.

To continue to contribute to this vital science, and the education it provides, we have worked closely with the Royal Geographical Society on their major expeditions to Kora National Park and Mkomazi Game Reserve. We have also had the benefit of the knowledge and expertise of our late chairman, Dr. Keith Eltringham of Cambridge University, who was one of the UK's leading zoological experts and a man who spent many years in the field specializing in the larger mammals and endangered species of Africa.

Our endeavours have been greatly enhanced by the cooperation of the sister trusts whose contact details appear on the contact page