George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trustelephants

News

25th anniversary held at the Royal Georgraphical Society On September 25th the trust celebrated the 25th Anniversary of the Mkomazi Project with a reception at the Royal Geographical Society in the presence of our patron HRH Princess Michael of Kent and HRH Prince Michael. Some 150 supporters and funders enjoyed the premier of a new film, produced by Jake Thomson, Astrid Harbord and Henry Morley, on Tony Fitzjohn’s life in Africa. That was followed by a stirring speech by Elisaria Nnko, the project’s Operations Manager and the longest serving employee at Mkomazi. Many of those present had met Elisaria in Tanzania over the years so it was a real treat to have him in London and witness the pride he takes in the project. [more]

New photos of rhino calves and Mr BRRRR Three new photos: [more]

Rhino sanctuary Fence repair and replacement is done on a continual basis.  Road works, drainage ditches, maintenance of existing roads are also carried out on a continual basis by the JCB, Fastrac and Cat grader. We were able to raise funds for a new digital radio system, which is a great addition to security.  The engineers are here now installing it. [more]

African wild dogs We have the full infrastructure in place to manage, breed, vaccinate and reintroduce the wild dogs, but the feed regime is such a rigorous task as there can be no failure in the daily meat supply.  These dogs can never have enough meat and it really does add to their overall health. [more]

About us

The George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trust was formed in England in 1979 to raise funds for the work being done in the Kora National Park in northern Kenya by George Adamson and his assistant Tony Fitzjohn.

Originally called the Kora Wildlife Preservation Trust,  George, in 1988,  asked that the name be changed to the George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trust so that projects could be undertaken that were not confined to Kora. Since then, substantial effort has gone in to the restoration of the Mkomazi Game Reserve in Tanzania as well as advice and aid being made available to Kora, when requested, in continuation of Adamson's dream of an Africa with wild and natural areas where animals can remain free.

So far, nearly two million dollars has been invested in this unique undertaking with funds provided by small groups of dedicated individuals as well as the generous backing of corporate sponsors and institutions. In addition, we continue to enjoy the full support of the Tanzanian Government, for whom the Mkomazi Game Reserve remains a National Priority Project. The Mkomazi project now directly employs over 40 Tanzanian personnel. We believe it to be one of the more important wildlife projects in Africa today.

To continue to contribute to this vital science, and the education it provides, we have worked closely with the Royal Geographical Society on their major expeditions to Kora National Park and Mkomazi Game Reserve. We have also had the benefit of the knowledge and expertise of our late chairman, Dr. Keith Eltringham of Cambridge University, who was one of the UK's leading zoological experts and a man who spent many years in the field specializing in the larger mammals and endangered species of Africa.

Our endeavours have been greatly enhanced by the cooperation of the sister trusts whose contact details appear on the contact page