George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trustelephants

News

Rhino sanctuary Fence repair and replacement is done on a continual basis.  Road works, drainage ditches, maintenance of existing roads are also carried out on a continual basis by the JCB, Fastrac and Cat grader. We were able to raise funds for a new digital radio system, which is a great addition to security.  The engineers are here now installing it. [more]

African wild dogs We have the full infrastructure in place to manage, breed, vaccinate and reintroduce the wild dogs, but the feed regime is such a rigorous task as there can be no failure in the daily meat supply.  These dogs can never have enough meat and it really does add to their overall health. [more]

Mr BRRRRR Our orphaned elephant does well. He is now two years old!  It has certainly been an intensive period.  He will continue to be milk dependant for another year or so, and then we will slowly wean him over the following year or two.  We have moved him over to the old elephant compound that was originally constructed to house the 27 year old zoo-raised elephant (Nina) that we took from a zoo and reintroduced back into the wild. [more]

Outreach Our environmental education programme goes well with an average of about 800 people visiting here every year on our specially adapted bus to see the work going on and learn about the black rhino and African wild dog.  The day is tightly structured and carefully choreographed and the feedback has been fantastic. [more]

George Adamson

George Adamson1906-1989

George Adamson, the "Lion Man" of Africa was one of the founding fathers of wildlife conservation. He is best known through the book and film "Born Free", the story of Elsa, an orphaned lioness raised and released into the wild by Adamson and his wife, Joy.

He was born in India in 1906 and first visited Kenya in 1924. After a series of adventures, which included becoming a gold prospector, he joined Kenya's game department in 1938 and, six years later, married Joy. It was in 1956 that he shot the lioness whose cub was to become world-famous as Elsa.

George Adamson retired as a game warden in 1961 and devoted himself to his many lions. In 1970, he moved to the Kora National Reserve in northern Kenya, working with Tony Fitzjohn as his right hand man, to continue the rehabilitation of captive or orphaned big cats for eventual reintroduction into the wild.

In 1989 at the age of 83, Adamson was murdered at Kora by Somali bandits.