George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trustelephants

News

Outreach GAWPT has always wanted to help construct a VTC.  With the great backing and support of the Suzuki Rhino Club, we were able to raise funds from the Suzuki Rhino Club ambassadors, the Watoto Foundation, Wilde Ganzen and the Fentener van Vlissingens.  Noud van Hout of the Watoto Foundation has overseen all the construction of the VTC and this is nearing completion. [more]

Park infrastructure TANAPA very kindly lent us their bulldozer to put in a water pan close to our camp, to be used hopefully by the small elephant herds that move around our camp for many months of the year.  TANAPA have also constructed a water pan in between their HQ and our camp in an area called Norbanda, and this is now used by wildlife, most significantly the small elephant herds. [more]

Wild dogs and Mr BRRRRR The wild dogs are breeding well and we have recently taken a family of 6 wild dogs (3 brothers, 3 sisters) over to the reintroduction compound on the Tsavo / Mkomazi border for release. [more]

Rhinos With the help of Daryll Pleasants of White Paw Training, we have brought in two tracker dogs (Belgian Mallinois breed) to help with the anti-poaching patrols for the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary.  TANAPA are supportive of this and their Chief Park Warden, Ecologist and Veterinary Officers have been here to help advise on this new project.  The tracker dogs are still young and in training and we have had fantastic help with both highly skilled training and the provision of equipment from Daryll and Donna Pleasants.  The tracker dog team also went to Lake Manyara in Tanzania and Ol Pejeta Ranch in Kenya for initial training. [more]

George Adamson

George Adamson1906-1989

George Adamson, the "Lion Man" of Africa was one of the founding fathers of wildlife conservation. He is best known through the book and film "Born Free", the story of Elsa, an orphaned lioness raised and released into the wild by Adamson and his wife, Joy.

He was born in India in 1906 and first visited Kenya in 1924. After a series of adventures, which included becoming a gold prospector, he joined Kenya's game department in 1938 and, six years later, married Joy. It was in 1956 that he shot the lioness whose cub was to become world-famous as Elsa.

George Adamson retired as a game warden in 1961 and devoted himself to his many lions. In 1970, he moved to the Kora National Reserve in northern Kenya, working with Tony Fitzjohn as his right hand man, to continue the rehabilitation of captive or orphaned big cats for eventual reintroduction into the wild.

In 1989 at the age of 83, Adamson was murdered at Kora by Somali bandits.